Abstract

It is surprising that up to the present there is no record of the finding of fossil marsupials in the large island of New Guinea, which in its recent fauna presents a strong similarity to the Australian continent, a similarity which without doubt obtained also in the Pleistocene and earlier. The existence today of the cassowary, echidna, tree kangaroos, wallabies, and other marsupials on both sides of Torres Strait, indicates that at one time there was land communication between Australia and New Guinea, and it is natural to expect that some of the extinct forms which are of common occurrence in Australia would also be found in the neighbouring island. That they have not previously been recognized there is probably due to the fact that until recently there were no mining, quarrying, or other operations in New Guinea, activities which often result in the discovery of fossil bones.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Anderson, 1937, Rec. Aust. Mus. 20(2): 73–78
Author
C. Anderson
Year
1937
Title
Palaeontological notes. No. IV
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
20
Issue
2
Start Page
73
End Page
78
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.20.1937.250
Language
English
Plates
plates viii–x
Date Published
27 August 1937
Cover Date
27 August 1937
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
MAMMALIA: MARSUPIALIA; PALAEONTOLOGY; NEW GUINEA
Digitized
13 May 2009
Available Online
16 July 2009
Reference Number
250
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17261/250.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17261/250.pdf
File size: 92kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17261/250_complete.pdf
File size: 1882kB