Abstract

Present day geomorphic processes on Long Island include rapid trimming of the coastline and caldera wall by wave action. Deep, rapidly eroding linear gullies cut in the youngest pyroclastic deposits expose numerous sections which allow reconstructions of the island's recent eruptive history.

Deposits from three major Plinian and Pelean pyroclastic eruptions dated at approximately 16,000, 4,000 and 200–300 radiocarbon years bp have been recognised. These phases of cataclysmic activity, probably with associated caldera collapse, were separated by numerous intermittent tephra falls many of which would have been heavy enough to destroy much of the physical environment of the island. Interpretation of the pyroclastic deposits erupted during the period of human occupation provide information about changes in the physical environment

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Blong et al., 1982, Rec. Aust. Mus. 34(7): 419–426
Author
R. J. Blong; C. F. Pain; C. O. McKee
Year
1982
Title
Long Island, Papua New Guinea: aspects of landforms and tephrostratigraphy
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
34
Issue
7
Start Page
419
End Page
426
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.34.1982.289
Language
English
Date Published
31 July 1982
Cover Date
31 July 1982
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ANTHROPOLOGY; ETHNOGRAPHY; NEW GUINEA
Digitized
27 January 2009
Available Online
02 March 2009
Reference Number
289
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17578/289.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17578/289.pdf
File size: 95kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17578/289_complete.pdf
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