Abstract

In a study of the body pterylosis of Atrichornis clamosus and Menura novaehollandiae, the dorsal and ventral feather tracts of these taxonomic enigmas are compared with the pterylae of 96 other passerine genera in an effort to discover relationships. I conclude that scrub-birds and lyrebirds are each other's closest relatives but that the degree of similarity is such that they should remain separated taxonomically, at least in different families. Their next closest relationships lie with the Paradisaeidae-Ptilonorhynchidae-Callaeidae complex; the degree of similarity is not strong, but it is stronger than it is to any other passerine group. Other major conclusions of this study are that: 1) the so-called 'corvid assemblage' is not a natural group; 2) Astrapia is a core member of the Paradisaeidae-Ptilonorhynchidae group, with its pattern lying between the normal patterns for paradisaeine and cnemophiline birds-of-paradise and reminiscent of that of bowerbirds; 3) Platylophus is not a corvid and Podoces, Pseudopodoces, and Ptilostomus are probably not, either; and 4) Grallina shows no pterylographic relationship to Struthidea and Corcorax.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Clench, 1985, Rec. Aust. Mus. 37(3): 115–142
Author
Mary Heimerdinger Clench
Year
1985
Title
Body pterylosis of Atrichornis, Menura, the "Corvid Assemblage" and other possibly related Passerines (Aves: Passeriformes)
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
37
Issue
3
Start Page
115
End Page
142
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.37.1985.305
Language
English
Date Published
20 November 1985
Cover Date
20 November 1985
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
AVES
Digitized
16 January 2009
Reference Number
305
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17651/305.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17651/305.pdf
File size: 150kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17651/305_complete.pdf
File size: 10661kB