Abstract

A mammal survey was carried out between 1984 and 1987 in southern West Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea. Eleven major collecting localities, as well as some more minor ones, lying at altitudes of between 120 and 3,200 m were investigated. Voucher specimens for 87 indigenous mammal taxa were obtained, but research suggests that mammal diversity in the area may be as high as 120 species. This is the highest mammal diversity recorded anywhere in Australasia. A similar high bird diversity suggests that the area may be one of exceptionally high biodiversity overall. The most diverse mammal assemblages in the study area are found in the midmontane oak forests (between 1,500 and 2,500 m). Seven species, which apparently have no ecological vicars elsewhere in PNG, inhabit these forests. Changing patterns of human exploitation endanger some species. Recommendations aimed at halting this decline are made. The effect of the introduction of cats in one area was assessed as cats were introduced in the middle of the survey period.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Flannery and Seri, 1990, Rec. Aust. Mus. 42(2): 173–208
Author
Tim F. Flannery; L. Seri
Year
1990
Title
The mammals of southern West Sepik Province, Papua New Guinea: their distribution, abundance, human use and zoogeography
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
42
Issue
2
Start Page
173
End Page
208
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.42.1990.114
Language
English
Date Published
06 July 1990
Cover Date
06 July 1990
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
MAMMALIA; NEW GUINEA; BIOGEOGRAPHY
Digitized
25 November 2008
Available Online
18 December 2008
Reference Number
114
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17726/114.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17726/114.pdf
File size: 82kB
Complete Work
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