Abstract

Dendrolagus scottae n.sp. inhabits mossy forest above 1,200 m on the North Coast Range, Papua New Guinea. Its total known habitat area is estimated at about 25-40 km2. The species is gravely endangered, and its plight is symptomatic of that of many large mammals in Melanesia. Dendrolagus scottae differs from all other tree-kangaroos in its uniform blackish colouration, narrow but long dentary, shallow face, and wide P/3 with a large posterobuccal cusp. The combination of large cheekteeth but small masticatory muscles suggest that D. scottae n.sp. has a different feeding strategy to other tree-kangaroos. Dendrolagus scottae n.sp. and D. dorianus possess a number of features which are unique among near relatives. These include the presence of a greatly reduced superior lachrymal foramen, large cheekteeth, uniformly dark dorsal and ventral colouration, and a very short tail. These derived features indicate that these two species are each other's closest relatives.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Flannery and Seri, 1990, Rec. Aust. Mus. 42(3): 237–245
Author
Tim F. Flannery; L. Seri
Year
1990
Title
Dendrolagus scottae n.sp. (Marsupialia: Macropodidae): a new tree-kangaroo from Papua New Guinea
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
42
Issue
3
Start Page
237
End Page
245
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.42.1990.117
Language
English
Date Published
16 November 1990
Cover Date
16 November 1990
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
MAMMALIA: MARSUPIALIA; TAXONOMY; NEW GUINEA
Digitized
26 November 2008
Available Online
18 December 2008
Reference Number
117
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17733/117.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17733/117.pdf
File size: 101kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17733/117_complete.pdf
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