Abstract

A stone quarry at Wadi el-Sheikh is recognized as an important source of flint in ancient Egypt. In 1896–1897 a substantial sample of stone artefacts, from fifteen separate workshops, was collected and placed in various museums across the world. This material remains virtually unknown, including two assemblages kept in Australia, which are analyzed in this study. It is evidenced that both workshops produced predominantly flint knives and a smaller number of cleavers for distribution away from the quarry, in an earlier part of the third millennium Before the Common Era (BCE) often referred to as the Early Dynastic Period (c. 3150–2686 BCE) and Old Kingdom (c. 2686–2181 BCE). There is a strong indication that the workshops represent a tiny portion of a large supply network. Two types of tools, a pick and a hoe, are recognized as digging implements associated with a quarry, but are also present on sites in Egypt where excavation took place.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Florek et al., 2019. Rec. Aust. Mus. 71(4): 121–137
Author
Stan Florek; Thomas Hikade; Sarah Carter
Year
2019
Title
The flint artefacts from two workshops at Wadi el-Sheikh, Eastern Desert, Egypt
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
71
Issue
4
Start Page
121
End Page
137
DOI
10.3853/j.2201-4349.71.2019.1681
Language
English
Date Published
24 July 2019
Cover Date
24 July 2019
ISSN
ISSN 0067-1975 (print); ISSN 2201-4349 (online)
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ARCHAEOLOGY; ANCIENT EGYPT
Digitized
24 July 2019
Available Online
24 July 2019
Reference Number
1681
EndNote
1681.enw
Title Page
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