Abstract

Sea snakes forage on the bottom but often bring prey to the surface to swallow. Surface activity not exclusively associated with feeding or breathing, sometimes occurs, especially at night. The skin is usually shed entire; it is loosened by rubbing against coral, curling and knotting or expanding the body. Courtship consists of the male swimming above the female and slightly behind her and then later pressing his body against hers while she rests on the sea bottom. Other topics are briefly discussed.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Heatwole et al., 1978, Rec. Aust. Mus. 31(18): 737–761
Author
Harold F. Heatwole; Sherman A. Minton; Ron Taylor; Valerie Taylor
Year
1978
Title
Underwater observations on sea snake behaviour
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
31
Issue
18
Start Page
737
End Page
761
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.31.1978.219
Language
English
Date Published
31 December 1978
Cover Date
31 December 1978
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
REPTILIA; OCEAN: INDIAN; OCEAN: PACIFIC; ECOLOGY, MARINE
Digitized
24 December 2008
Available Online
02 March 2009
Reference Number
219
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17530/219.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17530/219.pdf
File size: 72kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17530/219_complete.pdf
File size: 7221kB