Abstract

In northern Australia most koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are infected with the gammaretrovirus known as koala retrovirus (KoRV). KoRV is believed to be currently endogenizing into its host. Koalas were first introduced into three Japanese zoos in 1984 and now about 50 koalas are held in eight zoos. In 2007 KoRV was isolated from koalas reared in Japanese zoos, and, for the first time, an infectious molecular clone termed pKoRV522 was constructed. Using the molecular clone and KoRV isolates, we revealed the budding mechanism of KoRV and genomic diversity of KoRVs isolated from Japanese koalas. We found that KoRV utilizes the multivesicular body-sorting pathway. We also discovered a novel KoRV subgroup, named KoRV-J, which utilizes thiamine transport protein 1 as an entry receptor. The original KoRV, which utilizes Pit-1 as an entry receptor, is now named KoRV-A. In two Queensland koalas examined, the copy numbers of KoRV-J was less than 1 copy per cell and varied in tissues. These data, at least in these two koalas, suggest that KoRV-J is an exogenous retrovirus not an endogenous retrovirus.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Miyazawa, 2014. Tech. Rep. Aust. Mus., Online 24: 47–50
Author
Takayuki Miyazawa
Year
2014
Title
Molecular characterization of koala retroviruses isolated from koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) reared in Japanese zoos
Serial Title
Technical Reports of the Australian Museum, Online
Volume
24
Start Page
47
End Page
50
DOI
10.3853/j.1835-4211.24.2014.1613
Language
English
Date Published
30 May 2014
Cover Date
30 May 2014
ISSN
1835-4211 (online)
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
RETROVIRUS; ANIMAL DISEASE; VIROLOGY; MAMMALIA: MARSUPIALIA
Digitized
30 May 2014
Available Online
30 May 2014
Reference Number
1613
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/30986/1613.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/30986/1613.pdf
File size: 183kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/30986/1613_complete.pdf
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