Abstract

Casuarius australis was the only avi-faunal type secured during Kennedy's ill-fated expedition in 1848, from Rockingham Bay to Cape York, when so many valuable lives were lost. Singularly enough its early history is associated with the second, third and fourth Curators of the Australian Museum, which was the first Institution to receive a specimen.

For my purpose it will be necessary to transcribe the following extracts relating to Casuarius australis.

The existence of a Cassowary inhabiting Australia was first made known in 1849 by the late Mr. Wm. Carron, Botanist to the Kennedy Expedition, who remarks in his "Narrative" November 4th (1848):— "This morning Jackey went to examine a scrub through which we wanted to pass, and while out, shot a fine Cassowary; it was very dark and heavy, not so long in the leg as the common Emu, and had a larger body, shorter neck, with a large red, stiff, horny comb on its head; Mr. Wall skinned it, but from the many difficulties with which he had to contend, the "kill was spoiled before it could be properly preserved."

Referring to this specimen the following is the gist of Gould's remarks in his "Handbook to the Birds of Australia" under the name of Casuarius australis, Wall....

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
North, 1913, Rec. Aust. Mus. 10(4): 39–48
Author
Alfred J. North
Year
1913
Title
On the early history of the Australian Cassowary (Casuarius australis, Wall)
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
10
Issue
4
Start Page
39
End Page
48
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.10.1913.896
Language
English
Plates
plates viii–ix
Date Published
19 April 1913
Cover Date
19 April 1913
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
AVES
Digitized
16 January 2009
Available Online
06 March 2009
Reference Number
896
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17025/896.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17025/896.pdf
File size: 87kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17025/896_complete.pdf
File size: 1647kB