Abstract

In the present contribution it appears advisable that it should be prefaced by an explanation of the reason why scientific names and descriptions, which the majority of the public does not seem to quite understand, are published in the manner they are, and why such a course is necessary to the end for which they are written.

It is frequently asked "Why do you naturalists put long-winded Latin or Greek names to your specimens?" "Why not do so in plain English?" This is, however, not so easily complied with as may be imagined, and where done, it is in many cases, only calculated to mislead. Popular names are usually bestowed upon objects existing in nature by local consent and usage: that is by the folk inhabiting the particular district or region where the animals, plants, or whatever else they may be, exist; and these names convey to them, only, perhaps, an idea of what is meant. Professor Bell, a celebrated authority on British Crustacea, visiting

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Skuse, 1896, Rec. Aust. Mus. 2(7): 106–110
Author
F. A. A. Skuse
Year
1896
Title
Description of a Dapanoptera from Australia
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
2
Issue
7
Start Page
106
End Page
110
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.2.1896.1211
Language
English
Date Published
31 January 1896
Cover Date
31 January 1896
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Digitized
11 September 2009
Reference Number
1211
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/16683/1211.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/16683/1211.pdf
File size: 204kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/16683/1211_complete.pdf
File size: 614kB