Abstract

One of F.D. McCarthys earliest professional papers was a report of stone tools on Norfolk Island which he interpreted as evidence for pre-British visits by Pacific Islanders, probably from Polynesia. Since McCarthys paper (1934), additional artefactual, biological and historical evidences have supported his original conclusions. The present paper describes further finds and concludes that the evidence is firmly in favour of Pacific Islanders visiting and using the Kingston area of Norfolk Island about 700 years ago and, probably, again at a later date. These visits originated in the East Polynesian area, possibly the Society or Cook Islands and New Zealand, though a landing from Melanesia cannot be ruled out. Why there was no population on Norfolk at the time of its discovery by Cook in 1774 remains unanswered, but the answer probably lies in a range of factors. Further progress on understanding the islands prehistory requires the location and excavation of in situ deposits.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Specht, 1993, Rec. Aust. Mus., Suppl. 17: 145–157
Author
Jim Specht
Year
1993
Title
Additional evidence for pre-1788 visits by Pacific Islanders to Norfolk Island, south-west Pacific. In F.D. McCarthy, Commemorative Papers (Archaeology, Anthropology, Rock Art), ed. Jim Specht
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement
Volume
17
Start Page
145
End Page
157
DOI
10.3853/j.0812-7387.17.1993.66
Language
English
Date Published
27 May 1993
Cover Date
27 May 1993
ISBN
ISBN 0-7310-0280-6
ISSN
0812-7387
CODEN
RAMSEZ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ANTHROPOLOGY; CULTURE: INDIGENOUS; ETHNOGRAPHY
Digitized
16 June 2009
Reference Number
66
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17786/66.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17786/66.pdf
File size: 108kB
Complete Work
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