Abstract

The large number of paddles (approximately 320), which are part of the excellent collection of objects from the Solomon Islands, were bought by the Australian Museum in Sydney in two big parcels, according to the register of the Museum, from Richard Parkinson and Captain Farrell in 1885 and 18g8 respectively. The paddles are described as coming from the Buka district.

Richard Parkinson, author of the well-known book "Dreissig Jahre in der Suedsee" (Stuttgart, 1907) and many other valuable contributions to the investigations of the peoples, life and culture of the Pacific Islands, was the brother-in-law of Captain Farrell and both were related to "Queen Emma", a famous trading woman, who lived around 1880 in Rabaul.

This evidence shows that the paddles from the Buka district were made previous to 1885 or 1898 at the latest, when the Solomon Islanders were still more or less in their primitive state and had little contact with the white man. We therefore can look upon them as authentic specimens and products of the art expression of the Buka Passage Islanders, inspired by the feelings and the spiritual background of their time. The paddles are identified by their registration numbers, which are quoted in the text.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Spiegel, 1967, Rec. Aust. Mus. 27(3): 33–78
Author
H. Spiegel
Year
1967
Title
A study of Buka-Passage (Solomon Islands) ceremonial paddles
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
27
Issue
3
Start Page
33
End Page
78
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.27.1967.438
Language
English
Plates
plates 3–15
Date Published
10 February 1967
Cover Date
10 February 1967
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
OCEAN: PACIFIC; ANTHROPOLOGY
Digitized
09 December 2008
Available Online
03 March 2009
Reference Number
438
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17446/438.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17446/438.pdf
File size: 147kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17446/438_complete.pdf
File size: 11441kB