Abstract

The results of obsidian sourcing studies from the Anir Island assemblages are presented and compared with other studies to develop a regional picture of obsidian distribution and use over a three and a half thousand year period for the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea. Predicted changes in technology and mobility patterns are correlated with regional changes in the frequency and distribution of obsidian from particular sources in the region. Early Lapita assemblages in most parts of the archipelago were dominated by west New Britain obsidian. In the Middle Lapita period changes occurred in the northern and eastern Bismarck Archipelago and assemblages here became dominated by Admiralty Islands obsidian. In later periods, west New Britain obsidian re-gained dominance in some areas. Nevertheless, in the Lapita phases pottery assemblages suggest exchange was between culturally similar, socially related groups.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Summerhayes, 2004, Rec. Aust. Mus., Suppl. 29: 145–156
Author
Glenn R. Summerhayes
Year
2004
Title
The nature of prehistoric obsidian importation to Anir and the development of a 3,000 year old regional picture of obsidian exchange within the Bismarck Archipelago, Papua New Guinea. In A Pacific Odyssey: Archaeology and Anthropology in the Western Pacif
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement
Volume
29
Start Page
145
End Page
156
DOI
10.3853/j.0812-7387.29.2004.1411
Language
English
Date Published
19 May 2004
Cover Date
19 May 2004
ISBN
ISBN 0-9750476-2-0 (printed), ISBN 0-9750476-3-9 (online)
ISSN
0812-7387
CODEN
RAMSEZ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ANTHROPOLOGY
Digitized
19 May 2004
Available Online
19 May 2004
Reference Number
1411
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17978/1411.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17978/1411.pdf
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Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17978/1411_complete.pdf
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