Abstract

Thylacines have long fascinated both Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Ancient rock art depictions and recent attempts to clone thylacines with DNA from preserved specimens are good examples of this interest, with the Australian Museum involved in both the documentation of thylacine rock art and DNA sequencing. In this paper we report on a curious rock drawing from a site within Wollemi National Park, NSW and another rock art panel with superimposed paintings from Arnhem Land, NT. Both sites were found in recent years and documented as part of larger regional studies. Val Attenbrow has long argued that we should be cautious when interpreting archaeological evidence and assigning age, so with this in mind we offer a scientific assessment of these rare and unusual thylacine-like images. We conclude that images of thylacines were likely made over both a longer period of time and across a more geographically diverse area than previously realized.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Taçon et al., 2011. Tech. Rep. Aust. Mus., Online 23(11): 165–174
Author
Paul S. C. Taçon; Wayne Brennan; Ronald Lamilami
Year
2011
Title
Changing Perspectives in Australian Archaeology, part XI. Rare and curious thylacine depictions from Wollemi National Park, New South Wales and Arnhem Land, Northern Territory
Serial Title
Technical Reports of the Australian Museum, Online
Volume
23
Issue
11
Start Page
165
End Page
174
DOI
10.3853/j.1835-4211.23.2011.1576
Language
English
Date Published
18 June 2011
Cover Date
18 June 2011
ISSN
1835-4211
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ABORIGINES: AUSTRALIAN; ARCHAEOLOGY; CULTURE: INDIGENOUS; MAMMALIA: MARSUPIALIA
Digitized
18 June 2011
Available Online
18 June 2011
Reference Number
1576
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/21570/1576.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/21570/1576.pdf
File size: 38kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/21570/1576_complete.pdf
File size: 801kB