Abstract

[excerpt from p. 258] The soils above layer T at cave 1 provide a marked contrast between relatively uniform undifferentiated materials inside the cave and materials with distinct clay segregation outside. The shelter of the cave would be expected to afford considerable protection against the direct effects of leaching which are evident outside the cave; in addition, the more or less continuous disturbance of cave deposits by man, together with the accretion of charcoal and other organic material, would tend to mask the evidence of soil formation. The presence of clayey material and segregations within layer T inside the cave indicate, however, that soil development does take place in the sheltered environment when man is absent from the site. The high permeability of the sediments is no doubt sufficient to permit the movement of colloids with seepage water which would encroach on sheltered sites. It is likely, therefore, that disturbance and accretion due to human occupation have been major factors in minimizing soil differentiation of layers corresponding to PQ.R and S within the cave, while in exposed sites these layers were weathered and clay was translocated to form bands of accumulation.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Walker, 1964, Rec. Aust. Mus. 26(7): 247–264
Author
P. H. Walker
Year
1964
Title
Soil and landscape history in the vicinity of archaeological sites at Glen Davis, New South Wales
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum
Volume
26
Issue
7
Start Page
247
End Page
264
DOI
10.3853/j.0067-1975.26.1964.675
Language
English
Plates
plates 25–27
Date Published
12 June 1964
Cover Date
12 June 1964
ISSN
0067-1975
CODEN
RAUMAJ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ARCHAEOLOGY; GEODIVERSITY; ABORIGINES: AUSTRALIAN
Digitized
24 February 2006
Available Online
06 March 2009
Reference Number
675
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17429/675.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17429/675.pdf
File size: 47kB
Complete Work
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File size: 7565kB