Abstract

Fishbone from the settlement site at Emily Bay and excavations in West Emily Bay was identified on the basis of five mouth parts, checked against eight paired bones and some multiple and unique bones. The number of specimens (NISP) was counted and the Minimum Number of Individuals (MNI) calculated to display relative abundance of families. Lethrinidae dominate all assemblages, with Carangidae, Labridae and Serranidae as significant secondaries. Many specimens are large examples of the species. The domination of benthic feeders implies baited hooks, used over submerged reefs close to shore, were probably the most common technology. There are no deep water species present. Norfolk Island fishing appears to be very like that of prehistoric New Zealand.

 
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Bibliographic Data

Short Form
Walter and Anderson, 2001, Rec. Aust. Mus., Suppl. 27: 101–108
Author
Richard Walter; Atholl Anderson
Year
2001
Title
Fishbone from the Emily Bay settlement site, Norfolk Island
Serial Title
Records of the Australian Museum, Supplement
Volume
27
Start Page
101
End Page
108
DOI
10.3853/j.0812-7387.27.2001.1344
Language
English
Date Published
28 November 2001
Cover Date
28 November 2001
ISBN
ISBN 0-7347-2305-9
ISSN
0812-7387
CODEN
RAMSEZ
Publisher
The Australian Museum
Place Published
Sydney, Australia
Subjects
ARCHAEOLOGY; NORFOLK ISLAND; FISHES
Digitized
28 November 2001
Available Online
28 November 2001
Reference Number
1344
EndNote
/Uploads/Journals/17918/1344.enw
Title Page
/Uploads/Journals/17918/1344.pdf
File size: 11kB
Complete Work
/Uploads/Journals/17918/1344_complete.pdf
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